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Survey of burglars reveals 5 things you can do to protect your home from burglars

 
family at the kitchen table eating breakfast

A report by the Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC), which investigated the methods and motivations of convicted burglars, revealed the common things that make homeowners more vulnerable to burglary.

A report by the Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC), which investigated the methods and motivations of convicted burglars, revealed the common things that make homeowners more vulnerable to burglary.

With household burglary one of the most widespread crimes in Australia, here are five things you can do to protect the things you love.

1.    Lock windows and doors

Of those surveyed, over 65% of burglars enter the property through an unlocked door or window. Because open doors and windows are commonplace over the summer, as a result, burglary peaks during the warmer months. Installing deadlocks on doors and locks on windows, gates and security screens are effective deterrents (but make sure you use them).

Be aware burglars often target your home when you're visibly occupied with outdoor jobs, like washing your car or gardening, and enter via back and laundry doors. Parties and entertaining in your garden can also attract unwanted guests. With doors left open or unlocked and your home unattended, handbags, keys and wallets left on tables are easy targets. When outside or entertaining, lock your front and back doors and install a door bell so you know when your "invited" guests have arrived.

2.    Place valuables out of view

On average a burglar spends between five and 15 minutes inside your home. So the harder things are to locate the less likely they'll be taken. Place valuable items out of view, especially 'hot items' like laptops, mobile phones, jewellery, wallets and car keys. Money hidden in the freezer and jewellery in bedroom top drawers are easy targets. It's also a good idea to keep curtains and blinds closed or partly closed so your valuables aren't visible from the outside, which can encourage an opportunistic break in.

3.    Don't hide keys by doorways

This one needs no explanation. Keys left in easy-to-find locations makes breaking into your home a breeze for burglars.

4.    Get to know your neighbours

Rubbish bins left out for days, letterboxes overflowing, outside lights on and no cars in the driveway are tell-tale signs the owners are away and the house unoccupied—an attractive target for burglars. Get to know your neighbours so they can help by bringing bins in and collecting your mail. Installing sensor lights around your home is also an effective deterrent. But although a lack of lights indicates your house is empty, burglars said leaving lights and radios on, especially for hours and late at night, was the "oldest trick in the book" and a sign no one was home.

5.    Install an alarm and "other security measures"

What other protection measures can you take to prevent home break-ins? Having a working alarm system is certainly a great deterrent, and installing one can help you reduce your home and contents insurance premiums.

If you ever needed a reason to get a dog, here's a good one. Of the burglars surveyed in the AIC report, the number one deterrent is a dog. And don't worry about size, a bark is enough is stop burglars in their tracks because of a risk of drawing attention to themselves. This is good news for dog lovers.

Jun 06, 2019 | Found in: mediarelease,
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